Wednesday, February 16, 2011

Circular Honeycomb Brioche

Well, I was certainly pleasantly surprised by the response to my last blog. I figured about six people might want me to keep babbling about spinning, but there apparently are quite a few who enjoy the postings, so of course, I shall continue. As every blogger knows, feedback keeps us going. The last spinning post had four comments, so I figured that either (a) Harry was deleting posts just to be annoying or (b) everyone's head hit the keyboard in stupefaction when they saw Yet Another Spinning Post. Clearly, the answer is (c).

So, now that I have explained things to everyone's satisfaction, let me respond to several readers, who requested the secret to Circular Honeycomb Brioche. Here's the little neck warmer I made a using a strand of silk and a strand of cashmere:



The pattern is mildly tricky, but once you've run through one repeat, it's a no-brainer. Please swatch carefully, though. Brioche patterns are incredibly stretchy--you'll need a lot fewer stitches than you could possibly imagine.

Cast on an even number of stitches.

Row 1: Knit
Row 2: Purl
Row 3: K1, K1 below, that is, knit into the stitch of the previous row. Doing so unknits the stitch, so you will have the equivalent of a slipped stitch, thusly:



Row 4: P1, Purl the next stitch with the slipped thread of the previous row, as shown below.






Row 5: K1 below, K1
Row 6: Purl the next stitch with the slipped thread of the previous row, P1

Repeat rows 3-6.

I realize that this pattern could be done by slipping stitches instead of knitting in the stitch below. Many Brioche stitches are written using slips instead of belows. Try it both ways and see which one you prefer.

Next time, Harry will post about his exciting goat-herding class that he took in Albania, followed by a slide show of his whirlwind tour of Krasnoarmeisk, Myshkin, Putchezh, Kholui, Urupinsk, Mariinsky Posad, Kirillov, Suzdal and Gus-Krustalnyi.

Here ends my 300th post, and I want to thank all my readers from the bottom of my heart for your support and comments. Harry doesn't have a heart, but he thanks you from the bottom of his purple iPod for electing him Ruler of the Known Universe. Did you guys really do that?

37 comments:

Nik said...

Silk and Cashmere. That must feel like wearing heaven. And it must be super warm with the depth of that fabric. I love working that stitch.

Feri said...

I did not!!
I'm still here, reading@supporting ;)

Cheryl S. said...

Happy 300!
Please do not let my cat know that Harry was elected Ruler of the Known Universe, since she thought she held that position.

Linda said...

I cannot think of anyone I'd rather have as Ruler of the Universe than Harry. He's a resourceful and imaginative guy, so I expect things will be looking up soon.

Carolyn said...

Ah, Mariinski Posad - I wish I had fond memories of the place, but I don't. It sounds like a lovely garden, though. Just a little bit too closer to Hariiski Posad, though, especially when you remember that M is next to N in the alphabet, and a capital Russian N is a H.

Pretty Brioche. I've become fond of the yarnover way of working it, myself. And I am *not* (not, not, not) going to study and analyze your photos to see if they are upside down. They don't look rightside up, but you wouldn't do that to us. It must be my Brioche-reading skills that are cattywhompus.

WV: ulkab. Harry's preferred method of transportation out of Vostochnij Urupinsk.

PenCraft said...

That's a beautiful cowl. I'm going to go have to grab some needles and yarn to follow along here. Fun!

Puddytat purr said...

Yes, yes we did! ALL HAIL HARRY, RULER OF THE KNOWN UNIVERSE!!!

Strangely, the date on your post says 19th January, but it's only just shown up in my RSS reader :-/

silverroseknits said...

I don't remember electing him... but there was this one really wild party. :P

I've always been curious about brioche; perhaps it's time I give it another try.

Connie said...

Thanks for this pattern and the link to Krocus/Crocus!

Laritza said...

Go figure! I had never 'seen' the Honeycomb Brioche, I have a book, and have knit circular Brioche, but Honeycomb? It is lovely. Thanks for the pictures and detailed instructions.
Muy Bonito

Anne Marie said...

Thanks for this, I've been playing with the Brioche stitch lately and have to teach the Rodekool scarf to my spinning guild this weekend. It's an interesting technique.

m1k1 said...

And on behalf of the entire known universe, thank you to you too.
Some time I would really love to read about your Japanese embroidery.
.jen.

steelwool said...

You make brioche sound so easy. Have half a hat done, got sidetracked when cat jumped on couch and 4 stitches ran away in fear. Had to get an expert to find them for me. The k 1 below sounds better. Will try that next.

Vivianne said...

I am surely looking forward to Harry's photos of those far-flung exotic locations ! :-)

GailR said...

I so enjoy your writings and glimpses of Harry - Think I may have seen him late last year sneaking around the neighborhood - but that's another story.

Winterhart said...

I think it's an axiom left over from too many Scantron exams - the answer is always C!

That neckwarmer sounds amazing - silk and cashmere, yum! And you got them both to be the exact same shade of blue!

Leslie said...

Of course we (s)elected him Ruler of the Known Universe, you don't think he'd make something like that up out of thin air, do you? Harry??

Thanks for the photos - I think I may understand this :)

Dorothy said...

I am probably one of those guilty of lurking and not commenting. I'm always glad to see your blog come up in my notifier. Keep on posting!

Projektmanagerin: said...

I dare not NOT leave a comment ever again. Thanks for the enlightening post an a for me so far unknown stitch. That's Beginner's happiness: everything is new and exciting!
Looking forward to Harry's post too - though I am sure I never elected him anything. How's he coping with Rambo btw?
Oh, and I'd LOVE embroidery posts too!

Jan E said...

I also read your blog with great pleasure but probably haven't commented before. I frequently learn things that I didn't know before (of which, of course, there are volumes) and I enjoy your humor. Thanks for sticking with us quiet ones.

Laura Sue said...

I don't comment either, just truly admire your work and love your spinning posts. Particularly the supported spindle spinning videos. Awesome. So, would you be interested in teaching at SAFF?

Projektmanagerin: said...

*and then fleegle came and commented back at my post and she can't even read German*
is what I just very excitedly told my baffled husband. He was baffled, not because you posted a comment, but because he really has no clue what I am going on about.
Fleegle, truly, you are one of my knitting heroes! Being mostly a self-taught knitter I heavily rely on internet tutorials and explanations, and I really enjoy those few bloggers who can put the pure joy of the craft - any craft - into words. AND obviously take joy in crafting those words too!

(way too many blogs stop right at the "look-the-wool-I-bought-see-the-socks-I-knit" content...)

When I read your far-back post on your first fair-isle sweater of fifty years ago, I was so fascinated, I immediately started mentally teaching my as yet unborn children how to knit...

Anyway. My post is part of a series on me knitting my first "self-designed" sweater for my husband ever, trying to avoid the sweater curse, and just discovering Elizabeth Zimmermann (who has never been translated to German) and her famous EPS, while realizing that nobody ever told me that basic math class would come handy one day in my oh-so-feminine hobby... Thanks for stopping by. :-)

Johanna said...

I intend to learn to knit this year and I am putting together a local craft group to keep me company. I will be sharing your blog with my friends in hopes of learning something! So please keep writing!

-- Jolie said...

I teach honeycomb brioche as a knit one below technique, but now I've had a "Duh" moment for not noticing that we could just pick up the slip from the row below. Thank you for a brilliant and simple explanation for a technique that tends to be mired in mystique!

Oh, and I know I didn't vote Harry Lord of the Known Universe because Copernicus was already His Majesty, His Highness, His Imperiousness, Lord of the Universe.

gayle said...

Thank you for the excellent photos documenting brioche. I've read lots of instructions on how to do it, but had been confused by why some talked about slipping a stitch and others knit in the row below. Never dawned on me that it was two ways of achieving the same result until I saw your photo. D'oh!
I remember getting a ballot for Ruler of the Known Universe in the mail, but I think it ended up under a pile of knitting magazines...

LittleBerry said...

that's a beautiful texture.. thanks for showing about the knitting in the st belwo taht gets me every time!

Margit K. said...

It's my first time here and You gave me exactly what I needed!! I just tried to find circular honeycomb brioche last night but couldn't find anything really and now just stumbled on Your blog. It's much appreciated. Thank You!

Dave said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Dave said...

No, we never get tired of the spinning (or the lace, or Harry, or whatever else you might be up to!)

Happy 300!!

Michael said...

Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!

knittingdragonflies said...

OOO very pretty! I can't imagine how soft this is, and I love the color.
Thanks for sharing how you did it.
Vicki

ChelleC said...

I've always wondered about the brioche stitch. Your tutorials are so good and informative. Love seeing the step by step pictures. You really should write a book! I'd buy it.

Ann said...

Great post! Thanks for the brioche tutorial. I did get a bit of an eye-glaze reading the spinning tutorial(s), but I think it's 'coz I'm trying so very hard not to pick up another fibery hobby. Concentrating, as it were.

yarnlot said...

Looking forward to future posts! The process of Japanese embroidery must be just as lovely to watch as that of spinning on a Russian spindle...

Jane said...

300 posts of whimsy and wisdom! Thank You for all of them :-)

Vicki Stammer said...

Your posts are always provide the combined delights of humor and knowledge. Thank you for every word! Vicki Stammer

Sherry said...

Oh, I would love a video of this honey comb brioche in the round! I am a headstrong advanced-beginning knitter and I am determined to do this pattern! I've had trouble with rows 4 and 6 A video would be an amazing resource to get through these. Any possibility of posting one?