Thursday, September 16, 2010

Spinning for Lace Part Two: Russian Spindles

As promised, here is a video starring an exquisite ebony Russian Spindle from the Spanish Peacock. The motions are almost identical to those used with Tibetan spindles, but Russian spindles tend to be a bit wobbly until you pack some fiber on them. If you are having trouble starting up with your Russian, wind on some waste yarn until the spindle feels stable.

15 comments:

Janice in GA said...

Brilliant. That's exactly how I imagined you'd wind off/rewind.

Now I have to try this. And I'd love to have an ebony spindle.

LittleBerry said...

Another excellent production form 'Fleegle productions' :o) I do like the added 'written' notes hat come up

Puddytat purr said...

OK, I see, you pinch with your left, draft with your right, then when you stop drafting out, you release the pinch - right?

I still can't get the Russian to spin as long though...

slipstreamfiberarts said...

Wow, thanks for these posts on supported spindling! I've been wanting to give it a try.

knittingdragonflies said...

I don't have one of these! Yet! ha, Thanks for showing us how it is done!
Vicki

Batty said...

This is awesome! I have never tried a support spindle, but I really want to. Thanks for sharing!

Batty said...

Uh, like regular spinning isn't addictive? I have the fiber stash and spindle collection to prove it!

Off to poke around Spanish Peacock's etsy shop to see if there are any support spindles around...

swimsan said...

Your lovely video has inspired me to order a russian spindle from a local artisan, gripping yarns. We have a road trip planned, and I'd like to get some familiarity with this lovely wooden tool so I can spin while on the road. So far you're my ideal for smooth continuous movements. Sandy

Laritza said...

You have no idea of how inspiring and lovely your videos are.

No Two Snowflakes said...

just what I needed-- another spindle to need! seriously, I can't wait to try this, thanks for the amazing video-- is it so much faster than drop spindling? It looks it!

Jane said...

Another terrific instructional video! It makes so much sense when I see you do it. Thank you!

waysofthewhorl said...

Thanks so much for this video, it's helped me move beyond the 'park and draft' equivalent on the Russian spindle I just bought... You make it look so easy, I'm not quite as fast, but thanks to this I'm getting closer!

withaspindle said...

This video not only helped me fine tune how I spin (and thank you so much!), but it prompted me to also purchase a black ebony spindle!

Alek said...

Beautiful beautiful beautiful! I like watching this video when I'm stressed, it's so hypnotic. Someday I'll be able to do that too. hahah

Patricia A. said...

Thank you for these two videos. After watching you work, I'm looking forward to trying spinning again but with either a Tibetan or Russian spindle. I've had drop spindles for years, but spine damage meant they got re-purposed long ago for holding beads-on-thread for doing beaded crochet (I load the ball of thread onto the shaft--shimmed with a dish sponge if necessary--then use a bead spinner to load the line with 20 or 30 feet of beads, and then spin the prepped beads-and-line onto the spindle and work until I reach the beads, unwind the bulk of the beads, slide the beads down further to give myself more working line, then wind the beads and line back onto the spindle and keep working.) I've been able to do hand-work again for a little over two years now, and this style of supported spindle works within the limitations of what my back allows without throwing a hissy fit. Thank you!

Pat in North Carolina