Wednesday, August 4, 2010

Cool Winter Sweater

Many of you are probably complaining about the weather--killer temperatures, rampant humidity, eyeball-searing sunshine... But let's consider the positive aspects of the heat and humidity.

  • It's no longer necessary for us to bother with cooking vegetables from our garden. We can simply glance outside and watch them being gently steamed in the aftermath of a summer thunderstorm. This natural cooking process has been so successful that we don't bother dragging our healthy groceries into the kitchen anymore. We simply toss them on the back steps, sprinkle them with a little tamari, and sun-roast them. 
    • Should you be the proud owner of a moon rat, fairy bluebird, or capybara, you can rejoice in their comfort--after all, tropical rain forest is their native habitat.
    • And finally, if the study of molds is your specialty, you won't need any expensive laboratory equipment to pursue your interest.

    Alas, it's difficult to get enthused about knitting with wool, but a friend recently had a baby and she requested a warm sweater. The first thing I did was stroll around the Web, looking for superwash wool. I found a veritable mountain of the stuff, all priced at about $10 for 100 yards. A quick calculation revealed that a little sweater for a one-year-old (we're into future growth here) would cost about $50. A bit much for an item of clothing that would be quickly outgrown.

    Instead, I ordered a skein of Henry's Attic superwash DK merino for $14, and dyed it myself in the coolest color scheme I could think of: watermelon.



    A quick peek at my Knitware program produced a seamless, bottom-up pattern. And a day or two later, my needles produced this:



    I used a decorative ribbing on the hem, cuffs, and neckline. This little rib looks wonderful on socks, too.



    This pattern is meant for circular knitting. 
    Cast on any number of stitches divisible by 4.
     Row 1: k2, p2
    Row 2: k1, yo, k1, p2
    Row 3: k3, p2
    Row 4: k3, p2
    Row 5: k3, then pass the first stitch over the other 2 knits and drop it, p2


    And finally, I embroidered some seeds on the yoke.


    Keep cool, everyone. The next blog post will feature a brand-new fleegle fairy tale, so stay tuned!

    21 comments:

    Carolyn said...

    Cute sweater! Accurate cooking instructions. And a fairy tale? I hope it arrives before we go on vacation. My whole family is eagerly watching this spot.

    WV: woomen. Is that a directive, a regional pronunciation of women, or a descriptive adjective indicating a fast rate of travel? Hmm.

    Roy said...
    This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
    yarnlot said...

    Haha, I feel cooler already! Thanks for mentioning the local fauna although I hope you don't eat the capibara...
    And I am always in for a fluffy Fleegle fairy tale, with or without spider hair!

    Kitty Kitty said...

    Ohhh a Fleegle fairy tale cannot wait for the story!!!

    Hope a certain someone knit his rounds on your last project and that it is coming along nicely.

    The little watermelon sweater is absolutely adorable and thanks for the cooking insturctions. I think you will soon be able to have cooked Priscilla soon outside.

    Experimental Knitter said...

    I love watermelon patterns. I love that sweater. May have to make it out of the watermelon spaced-dyed yarn I just got from Freshisle Fibers.
    You wrote: *And finally, if the study of molds is your specialty, you won't need any expensive laboratory equipment to pursue your interest.
    Well, I told that to DH (who like you is a yeast molecular biologist), and he sort of snorted. I do have an interesting set of toadstools coming up among the hydrangeas though.

    Shea said...

    Very cute sweater!

    JelliDonut said...

    Adorable!

    travellersyarn said...

    Could you be more creative? A very cute sweater - I'm impressed.

    LittleBerry said...

    Lovely sweater and so different :o)

    Vivianne said...

    That is one great sweater ! :-)

    Susan (and SmokeyBlue in spirit) said...

    Great sweater.

    You forgot entomologists. I can verify the larvae and other insects being born by the second in this delightful so called summer weather.
    And it must be even hotter where you are. arghhhhh
    90 with 75% humidity here. At least I can get my daily ration of Vit D.

    Roberta said...

    What a juicy little sweater you've created. Love it.

    Carol said...

    I love watermelon colours and a watermelon sweater is too.cute. Love!

    gayle said...

    We've been having Florida weather in Vermont. Yesterday the humidity was so high, it was like breathing oatmeal...

    Soo said...

    I love the watermelon sweater. It is destined to be a favourite with the recipients!

    KPiep said...

    I always wanted a capybara...

    Lovely sweater!

    Rosemary said...

    Darling sweater! What a lucky baby!

    I remember those days of heat and humidity only too well. Here in the desert, we don't do too much steaming, but I can certainly relate to roasting the vegs on the back steps. Good idea to add tamari, lol.

    Rosemary

    Rob Knits said...

    Adorable sweater. Very cool and juicy-looking. And while the capybara is happy, I'm melting.

    Mary Caroline Mixon,D/C said...

    Your log is sooo creative. Is there an email address where I can ask your permission on a pattern? I am an alpaca farmer. I am making some items and would like to use one of your patterns.
    Regards
    Caroline

    Sarah said...

    I too share your sentiment about cost of knitting a baby sweater. Thankfully, you are so talented. The dyed wool colorways are delicious. The sweater design is adorable. Your friend's baby is lucky to have this beautiful gift, to be wrapped in every stitch with love. Thanks for sharing. I am forwarding your post to my dear friend who is going to be grandma and has been knitting up a storm for her granddaughter to come. She will appreciate this grand design :D Happy knitting!

    Jane said...

    I LOVE that sweater! Wonderful job of dyeing and knitting!